Weekly Hot Topic | Children's Radio Foundation

We use radio to amplify youth voices across Africa, giving them the skills and tools to speak about their lives

LGBTI Exhibition shares Cape Town stories with the public

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Interview with Prince Harry and Elton John at the International AIDS Conference 2016 from Children's Radio Foundation on Vimeo.

During the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, two of our youth reporters had the fantastic opportunity to have a sit-down interview with Prince Harry of Wales and legendary singer, Elton John. Here is the interview that went live to the world in July 2016! This was one of the highlights of the year for us.

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Mobile journalists Mojo Velo, stopped by to visit some of our youth reporters in Lusaka, Zambia recently, and filmed them as they prepared to broadcast their Saturday morning show. These reporters with the Agents of Change Foundation focus on encouraging action on climate change, environmental sustainability and human rights.

The team of three ‘journalists on bicycles’ make up Mojo Velo, and have been travelling for about 5 months from Cape Town, on their way to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. They are cycling unsupported (fully self sufficient, and relying on the Ubuntu spirit of the people they meet), and will cover as many as 15,000 km on their journey. On their trip, they are sharing people’s stories of sustainability and innovation, challenging negative perceptions of Africa and promoting its innovation, ingenuity and resilience.

Mojo Velo created this documentary short film about their day spent with the ‘Y-Green’ youth reporters...

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The Children’s Radio Foundation’s “Ghetto Genius” youth reporters at Aganang FM in Potchefstroom took to the airwaves recently, following the murder of openly gay 17 year-old learner Lesley Makousa in their community.

Makousa was strangled to death with a shoelace, and his body was found in an abandoned area in Promosa Township. A 32 year-old suspect has since been arrested. His murder and other attacks against the LGBTI community are a reminder of the intense stigma and homophobia that punctuate the lives of LGBTI youth across South Africa. The youth reporters produced their hour-long show to get the community speaking about the challenges local LGBTI youth face.

In their show, they interviewed Thabiso Mogapi wa Tsotetsi, Chairperson of Action For Social Justice International, who noted that there was still a lot that needed to be done, and that schools had an important role to play: not just targeting learners, but also...

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I am Velisa Jara and I’m a lesbian from Khayelitsha, Cape Town in South Africa. I’m a photographer. I am good at teamwork, leading young people, communicating and giving youth advice. What is important to me is to be treated equally. Sometimes when people treat me badly, I’m scared to live in my community. I wish I could be treated like someone’s sister or someone’s friend, and not like an alien in my own community. Then I’d feel free and safe.

Radio is powerful. It gives youth the space to speak about their issues and have the platform to share their own experiences, live. One of the most important radio pieces that I’ve been involved in was an audio drama that we did with Siyaziwa, a young reporter group from Khayelitsha. It was an LGBTI audio drama where we were telling our own stories. I learnt how to create my own character and script in the drama story. We recorded it and the Introduction to the drama was...

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We’re Live! Our Pop-up radio station at the International AIDS Conference in Durban is live and our young reporters from Tanzania, Zambia, Ivory Coast, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) start broadcasting full time on Tuesday 19 July.

To join the estimated 8 million listeners across Africa, find our live radio streaming link. Our team of 16 youth reporters have honed their radio skills in the areas of research, interviewing, and content production. They are all involved in regular broadcasting and “narrowcasting” at their respective local community and school stations.  With the pop-up station at AIDS 2016, they hope to foster youth expression, debate, and to keep decision-makers on their toes and hold them to account.

The young reporters will challenge delegates and experts to engage with them on topics such as stigma, LGBTI issues, treatment and youth-friendly services, bringing a ‘hard talk’ youth...

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